Child custody battles are tough and emotionally draining, even when parents are in the same town. Imagine then the emotions and frustrations arising in an ongoing child custody fight in which the father is in the U.S. and the mother has fled to Argentina, taking her two young daughters with her. The trip to Argentina occurred over three years ago, and the two girls are now seven and four. During that time, the father says he has only seen pictures of his children but has not been able to visit with them.

Child custody cases in Arizona and nationwide are emotional and can be drawn out. Often adding to the complexity and expense of a child custody battle is the role of a court-appointed advocate who is supposed to speak out for the independent interests of a child. Most people acknowledge that in the vast majority of cases, even those that are hotly contested, both parents sincerely have the child’s best interests at heart. However, the child’s advocate, known as a guardian ad litem (for purposes of the litigation) can speak for the child’s interests, with no duty to advocate for either parent.

A Phoenix, Arizona, grandmother, trying to gain child custody of her granddaughter, has been accused of attempting to frame her son on drug charges to gain an advantage in the custody battle. Police arrested the 58-year-old grandmother, accusing her of child abuse for allegedly sending the 9-year-old girl to school one day with a container of cocaine and instructing the granddaughter to falsely state that the drugs belonged to her father.

Divorce can turn into a stressful situation for both parties involved, including any children the couple may have together. Child custody — which usually brings child support with it — is often the most contentious part of a divorce for people who have children.

When Arizona parents get divorced, child custody often becomes the primary issue. Once an arrangement is reached, parents are expected to abide by it. Some circumstances, however, may warrant a change in child custody. An example of a situation that may be grounds for a child custody change recently occurred near Arizona.

An Arizona man accused of taking his 5-month-old daughter from her mother’s home without permission was arrested in Utah on Wednesday, police said. The 47-year-old father, who happens to be a captain with the local fire department, took the baby after a custody disagreement with the child’s mother, according to the local police department. Police said the father does not have custodial rights.

The father was stopped by the local highway patrol a few miles from the Arizona border, police said. The baby was found unharmed in the backseat of his truck. Police believed the man was headed toward Montana with the baby. Police said he is facing probable custodial interference and/or kidnapping charges.

The interests of children are almost always best served by the agreement of both parents. Divorced parents who can gather together to work out parenting plans and later modify them to include the needs of everyone involved – whether those needs include changing the schedule, moving, or some other issue – do their children a great kindness.

Arizona residents facing child custody issues should not feel overwhelmed. There are family legal professionals who can help in making the process a more peaceful, smooth transition. It is important for those facing child custody issues to seek answers and make sure their rights — and the rights of their children — are protected.

Source:  kgun9.com, “Man arrested at Ariz-Utah border in custody case” Rikki Mitchell, Sep. 18, 2013

Divorce can turn into a stressful situation for both parties involved, including any children the couple may have together. Divorce is an ordinary event for Arizona residents just as it is across the country. Regardless of income or societal status, divorce can be a necessity for any couple.

When Arizona parents get divorced, child custody often becomes the primary issue. Once an arrangement is reached, parents are expected to abide by it. Some circumstances, however, may warrant a change in child custody. An example of a situation that may be grounds for a child custody change recently occurred in court between hip-hop artist Usher and his ex-wife.

Arizona readers may want to follow yet another international child custody dispute that is being heard by a federal court located in a northeastern state. This custody dispute dates back to 2006, when a Turkish court granted a divorce petition to the father of two children and awarded child custody to him. The mother, a United States citizen, subsequently fled the country in apparent defiance of the court order and ultimately returned to this country.

The vast majority of child custody disputes involve two parents who are struggling of the care and control of their shared children. It is important to remember, however, that family courts in Arizona and across the nation see a wide range of child custody actions in any given year. One recent case demonstrates the complicated issues that can come before these courts, and the importance of following adoption policies carefully in order to avoid heartbreak.

When it comes to divorce and children in Arizona, some authorities say that technology offers an opportunity to keep things on an even keel when dealing with child custody and visitation issues. When two people without children divorce, they have the luxury of avoiding contact with their ex-partner should they choose to do so. However, that is decidedly more difficult when there are minor children involved, and problems with communication can quickly lead to a further child custody dispute.

An interesting child custody proceeding was set to go to trial in late August. Arizona readers may know about the dispute, which pits a beauty pageant-loving mother against an ex-con father. The mother has her young daughter participating in child beauty pageants and was featured last year on the popular reality TV show “Toddlers & Tiaras.” The father objects to what he refers to as the sexualizing of his young daughter and has requested that he be granted child custody. But he has a criminal record that includes a felony conviction, and is said to have been convicted on a number of occasions for DUI and endangering the welfare of a child.

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